Completely confused, need guidance on how to study

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I recently shifted from matric/Fsc to O levels. I'm in my first year. I'm also new to my school, so no friends to help me out. I'm extremely confused about how to study. I've been googling a lot for information but I still haven't been able to make a coherent plan on how to go about studying for O levels.

This is the information I have gathered so far:

1.There is a course outline on Cambridge's website that tells me what I need to know for the exam
2.There is no standard book or notes. Multiple books for each subject are available. Similarly, many people have made notes for various subject and shared them online. Schools recommend a book for each subject, and students generally use that
3.The goal isn't to follow a specific book or set of notes, rather, it is to follow the course outline and make sure you know every thing in it. So if something is missing in my book and notes, I need to use another resource to get hold of that information
4.Its important to make sure you understand everything. This means I may need to use other books, the internet, or youtube for clarification when I feel the need

Assuming I'm correct about the above, I'm going to talk about whats confusing me. Exactly how do I go about making notes for each subject? I feel I have multiple ways to go about it:
1.Use my school recommended textbook as the baseline:
- This means I read my book in sequence cover to cover
- I will need to study my classnotes along with my textbooks. I'm not sure how efficient this is, because I fear I'll be constantly going back and forth through my classnotes to find the topic I'm studying, since I'm following the sequence of my textbook. Another issue I think may arise is that there may be a significant overlap of information (eg, 90% of whats in my classnotes is already in the textbook, and its only the additional 10% I need to read). This overlap means I will be reading a lot of information twice. Is it a good idea to "merge" my textbook with my classnotes, ie, if theres some additional information in my classnotes, I can just write it on my textbook with the relevant topic? If I go this route, is it best to just write on my textbook, or get hold of a pdf version of my textbook and type out the extra info?
2.Use someones online notes as the baseline:
- This will be the same method as above, except the online notes (typed) will be my base, and to this I will add any missing information I see in my textbook & class notes

Also, I've looked at some of the textbooks as well as the notes people have uploaded. There seems to be a significant difference in information between them. Why is it so? If everyone's following the same course outline, shouldnt all notes and textbooks contain roughly the same information?

And since information can vary significantly between different textbooks and notes, are there any that are considered the best or "gold standard" for getting an A/A+ in the subjects? Is there anywhere I can see a list of the gold-standard study material/methods for scoring A/A+ in each subject?

I also want to ask how to pick out deficiencies in my notes. (Eg browsing through this website I came across a post that mentioned some must-do books for Pakistan studies, which I hadn't even heard of. Not only that, but the poster mentioned how one needs to look for specific topics in that book. How would I know if I'm deficient in an area? Eg, there might be a topic in the course outline I have studied, but I might not have studied it to the required detail (for scoring an A/A+). How do I get an idea of the required level of detail I need, so that I can decide when to look at additional resources?

As you can see, I'm very confused and really have a very poor idea of how to study for O levels. I'm sure theres a bunch of questions I should've asked, but didn't, simply due to my ignorance. I don't mind making my own notes or working hard, however, I'm thoroughly confused about how to go about it. I hope you guys can help me out, thank you!
 
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ur school should tell you about what books u should purchase
I know a sudden change makes you feel like u are lagging behind but o level notes can be found all share the same content but I prefer new or recently made notes since the syllabus changes

Home - StudentBase (content --> o level-----> choose ur subject)
use this site it helped me
 
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I recently shifted from matric/Fsc to O levels. I'm in my first year. I'm also new to my school, so no friends to help me out. I'm extremely confused about how to study. I've been googling a lot for information but I still haven't been able to make a coherent plan on how to go about studying for O levels.

This is the information I have gathered so far:

1.There is a course outline on Cambridge's website that tells me what I need to know for the exam
2.There is no standard book or notes. Multiple books for each subject are available. Similarly, many people have made notes for various subject and shared them online. Schools recommend a book for each subject, and students generally use that
3.The goal isn't to follow a specific book or set of notes, rather, it is to follow the course outline and make sure you know every thing in it. So if something is missing in my book and notes, I need to use another resource to get hold of that information
4.Its important to make sure you understand everything. This means I may need to use other books, the internet, or youtube for clarification when I feel the need

Assuming I'm correct about the above, I'm going to talk about whats confusing me. Exactly how do I go about making notes for each subject? I feel I have multiple ways to go about it:
1.Use my school recommended textbook as the baseline:
- This means I read my book in sequence cover to cover
- I will need to study my classnotes along with my textbooks. I'm not sure how efficient this is, because I fear I'll be constantly going back and forth through my classnotes to find the topic I'm studying, since I'm following the sequence of my textbook. Another issue I think may arise is that there may be a significant overlap of information (eg, 90% of whats in my classnotes is already in the textbook, and its only the additional 10% I need to read). This overlap means I will be reading a lot of information twice. Is it a good idea to "merge" my textbook with my classnotes, ie, if theres some additional information in my classnotes, I can just write it on my textbook with the relevant topic? If I go this route, is it best to just write on my textbook, or get hold of a pdf version of my textbook and type out the extra info?
2.Use someones online notes as the baseline:
- This will be the same method as above, except the online notes (typed) will be my base, and to this I will add any missing information I see in my textbook & class notes

Also, I've looked at some of the textbooks as well as the notes people have uploaded. There seems to be a significant difference in information between them. Why is it so? If everyone's following the same course outline, shouldnt all notes and textbooks contain roughly the same information?

And since information can vary significantly between different textbooks and notes, are there any that are considered the best or "gold standard" for getting an A/A+ in the subjects? Is there anywhere I can see a list of the gold-standard study material/methods for scoring A/A+ in each subject?

I also want to ask how to pick out deficiencies in my notes. (Eg browsing through this website I came across a post that mentioned some must-do books for Pakistan studies, which I hadn't even heard of. Not only that, but the poster mentioned how one needs to look for specific topics in that book. How would I know if I'm deficient in an area? Eg, there might be a topic in the course outline I have studied, but I might not have studied it to the required detail (for scoring an A/A+). How do I get an idea of the required level of detail I need, so that I can decide when to look at additional resources?

As you can see, I'm very confused and really have a very poor idea of how to study for O levels. I'm sure theres a bunch of questions I should've asked, but didn't, simply due to my ignorance. I don't mind making my own notes or working hard, however, I'm thoroughly confused about how to go about it. I hope you guys can help me out, thank you!
Hi. Thank you for highlighting your concerns in a clear way. I appreciate that you have researched online about O levels and fortunately you have come across relevant key points.

Your confusions are justified and understandable. You stand right to highlight that "No particular book or notes shall be sufficient to cater to the syllabus needs"
Another of the point "Information in notes varies, whereas considering the fact that since the syllabus outline is the same, it should roughly contain the same information".
Study techniques and the choice of books and notes depends on your convenience and since you have shifted from Matric to O level it shall seem slightly harder, Hang On!

1. Do not get confused through the notes and the tremendous amount of information sources, as you progress through O levels, with time you shall realize that everyone will tend to give you recommendations but you shall stick to what your school suggests.
2. Textbooks and information sources are ideally preferred by schools and teachers.
3. Do not try to find a shortcut to textbooks through the notes.
4. Make your own notes; the best method is to use different course books and combine the information and make your own notes

My recommendations;
My school suggested the following books.

Pak studies
History
. History and Culture of Pakistan - Nigel Kelly
. History, Culture & Government - Nigel Smith
. Pakistan; A Historical and Contemporary look - Farooq Bajwa
Other resources used by me;
. Internet websites
. A one guide towards Pakistan (This is some old history book for CSS which I had lying around my house and rarely use)
. A NEW HISTORY OF INDO PAKISTAN (This is again some really old book which I have lying around in my house and hardly use)

Geography
. Environemnent of Pakistan Huma Naz Sethi

Islamiat
. Yasmin Malik's Book
. Farkhanda's Book
. One more ; a book by Dr. Saqib
( You can google)


* ONLY MY RECOMMENDATIONS AS PER MY SCHOOL.

Consider using marking schemes and examiner reports as sources of information for a particular question.
. Search up for learner guides of your subjects on google.

As far as "YAAD KARNA" is concerned, I memorized from Nigel Kelly's Book and read from other two books stated above.
Let me know if you need recommendations for science subjects.
 
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I also want to ask how to pick out deficiencies in my notes. (Eg browsing through this website I came across a post that mentioned some must-do books for Pakistan studies, which I hadn't even heard of. Not only that, but the poster mentioned how one needs to look for specific topics in that book. How would I know if I'm deficient in an area? Eg, there might be a topic in the course outline I have studied, but I might not have studied it to the required detail (for scoring an A/A+). How do I get an idea of the required level of detail I need, so that I can decide when to look at additional resources?
I felt that I did not answer this part of yours in my earlier post.
I hope that you are connected to a school.

See, to rewrite your question "How will I know, if a particular book or resource covers the right and complete of a topic in the syllabus"
1. Ask your teacher; Question your instructor about what you need to know regarding a topic, ask this question "What type of questions come in the past papers/ What is the main focus of the past papers regarding this topic"
. Your teacher shall be the best of your guides, when it comes to understanding the syllabus, do not scare to ask your teacher's questions, ask twice, thrice, until you have a strong grip. (Don't hesitate if the teacher scolds you or classmates laugh at you - Be brave!!

2. Refer to the syllabus originally published by Cambridge - you can search on google with the subject name, standard (i.e. O level), and Ideally the subject code if known.
. For example, if you have studied a particular topic, tick marks those pointers in the syllabus which you have done and highlight the ones which are left to be done in school.
. Once that topic is finished in school, check again, and ask your teacher if you feel that any part is left.
. Sometimes they language/terms used in the original syllabus differ from those told/ referred by your teacher, do not hesitate to confirm.

3. Refer to past papers.
.Read through questions in the past papers and ask your teacher if you feel anything is missing.
 
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I recently shifted from matric/Fsc to O levels. I'm in my first year. I'm also new to my school, so no friends to help me out. I'm extremely confused about how to study. I've been googling a lot for information but I still haven't been able to make a coherent plan on how to go about studying for O levels.

This is the information I have gathered so far:

1.There is a course outline on Cambridge's website that tells me what I need to know for the exam
2.There is no standard book or notes. Multiple books for each subject are available. Similarly, many people have made notes for various subject and shared them online. Schools recommend a book for each subject, and students generally use that
3.The goal isn't to follow a specific book or set of notes, rather, it is to follow the course outline and make sure you know every thing in it. So if something is missing in my book and notes, I need to use another resource to get hold of that information
4.Its important to make sure you understand everything. This means I may need to use other books, the internet, or youtube for clarification when I feel the need

Assuming I'm correct about the above, I'm going to talk about whats confusing me. Exactly how do I go about making notes for each subject? I feel I have multiple ways to go about it:
1.Use my school recommended textbook as the baseline:
- This means I read my book in sequence cover to cover
- I will need to study my classnotes along with my textbooks. I'm not sure how efficient this is, because I fear I'll be constantly going back and forth through my classnotes to find the topic I'm studying, since I'm following the sequence of my textbook. Another issue I think may arise is that there may be a significant overlap of information (eg, 90% of whats in my classnotes is already in the textbook, and its only the additional 10% I need to read). This overlap means I will be reading a lot of information twice. Is it a good idea to "merge" my textbook with my classnotes, ie, if theres some additional information in my classnotes, I can just write it on my textbook with the relevant topic? If I go this route, is it best to just write on my textbook, or get hold of a pdf version of my textbook and type out the extra info?
2.Use someones online notes as the baseline:
- This will be the same method as above, except the online notes (typed) will be my base, and to this I will add any missing information I see in my textbook & class notes

Also, I've looked at some of the textbooks as well as the notes people have uploaded. There seems to be a significant difference in information between them. Why is it so? If everyone's following the same course outline, shouldnt all notes and textbooks contain roughly the same information?

And since information can vary significantly between different textbooks and notes, are there any that are considered the best or "gold standard" for getting an A/A+ in the subjects? Is there anywhere I can see a list of the gold-standard study material/methods for scoring A/A+ in each subject?

I also want to ask how to pick out deficiencies in my notes. (Eg browsing through this website I came across a post that mentioned some must-do books for Pakistan studies, which I hadn't even heard of. Not only that, but the poster mentioned how one needs to look for specific topics in that book. How would I know if I'm deficient in an area? Eg, there might be a topic in the course outline I have studied, but I might not have studied it to the required detail (for scoring an A/A+). How do I get an idea of the required level of detail I need, so that I can decide when to look at additional resources?

As you can see, I'm very confused and really have a very poor idea of how to study for O levels. I'm sure theres a bunch of questions I should've asked, but didn't, simply due to my ignorance. I don't mind making my own notes or working hard, however, I'm thoroughly confused about how to go about it. I hope you guys can help me out, thank you!
PAST PAPERS AND TOPICALS

I still remember when I first entered into my O level classroom/section for the first time, (It was my first day) every single subject teacher that came into the classroom, asked to get "topicals". I mean it! Every single subject teacher. As a candidate now appearing in May/June 2021 series, I realize that they were very very right. Past papers are a must!!

Now, don't get worried by the introductory paragraph which I wrote 😂😅😁
Here are again a few recommendations

. For every subject I recommend you to get "Topical past papers".
In O levels there are two types of past paper classifications
1. Topical - These have past papers arranged topic-wise/ topics that are included in the syllabus / course content.
2. Yearly - These have past papers arranged year-wise (i.e. 2002, 2003 etc)

1. Topical past papers;
. Assuming that you are a starter of O level, I recommend getting past papers that are topic-wise.
Why?
As soon as you finish a topic in class, open that topic from past papers, review the questions. When I mean "AS SOON AS", it is really meant.
Why?
The knowledge is fresh in your mind and you shall be able to implement it way quicker on the past papers.
. You will be able to clear out confusion from your teacher at the earliest.

2. Yearly;
If you are a starter at O levels, I shall not recommend them, you will just get confused.
Get them once you have finished WHOLE o level syllabus in school. This way you shall be able to practice in a better way.


RECCOMENDED PAST PAPER WEBSITES
1. Papa Cambridge, GCE GUIDE
2. Teachify me, Past papers.co
(Google them up)

RECCOMENDED PAST PAPERS BOOKS/TOPICALS

Pak Studies;
POINT : My history teacher never recommended relying on "built-in" 😂 or written answers in topicals. They are not according to the marking scheme standards and having dealt with O levels for 2 years, I believe that she is right. My teacher's recommendation.

.Redspot; this doesn't have a topical for Pak studies, it does have a yearly one, but again the written answers are not recommended.
. MS Books: This has both yearly and topical past papers, again I recommend topical ones. They have marking schemes instead of written answers, which is way better and amazing.

For history, I use MS BOOKS and for geography, I use "Redspot past papers"

Islamiat :
Since Islamiat doesn't have formatting issues and it is more of a "FREE" subject, you can write freely as long as it is relevant, I use redspot past papers.

Sciences ; I use redspot papers again as they are conceptual subjects.

BEST OF ALL TIMES: The best way is that you pick up a question from your topical past papers and open up it's marking scheme from net , available on websites suggested above. If you want, I have compiled a one in all marking schemes if you need.
 
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I recently shifted from matric/Fsc to O levels. I'm in my first year. I'm also new to my school, so no friends to help me out. I'm extremely confused about how to study. I've been googling a lot for information but I still haven't been able to make a coherent plan on how to go about studying for O levels.

This is the information I have gathered so far:

1.There is a course outline on Cambridge's website that tells me what I need to know for the exam
2.There is no standard book or notes. Multiple books for each subject are available. Similarly, many people have made notes for various subject and shared them online. Schools recommend a book for each subject, and students generally use that
3.The goal isn't to follow a specific book or set of notes, rather, it is to follow the course outline and make sure you know every thing in it. So if something is missing in my book and notes, I need to use another resource to get hold of that information
4.Its important to make sure you understand everything. This means I may need to use other books, the internet, or youtube for clarification when I feel the need

Assuming I'm correct about the above, I'm going to talk about whats confusing me. Exactly how do I go about making notes for each subject? I feel I have multiple ways to go about it:
1.Use my school recommended textbook as the baseline:
- This means I read my book in sequence cover to cover
- I will need to study my classnotes along with my textbooks. I'm not sure how efficient this is, because I fear I'll be constantly going back and forth through my classnotes to find the topic I'm studying, since I'm following the sequence of my textbook. Another issue I think may arise is that there may be a significant overlap of information (eg, 90% of whats in my classnotes is already in the textbook, and its only the additional 10% I need to read). This overlap means I will be reading a lot of information twice. Is it a good idea to "merge" my textbook with my classnotes, ie, if theres some additional information in my classnotes, I can just write it on my textbook with the relevant topic? If I go this route, is it best to just write on my textbook, or get hold of a pdf version of my textbook and type out the extra info?
2.Use someones online notes as the baseline:
- This will be the same method as above, except the online notes (typed) will be my base, and to this I will add any missing information I see in my textbook & class notes

Also, I've looked at some of the textbooks as well as the notes people have uploaded. There seems to be a significant difference in information between them. Why is it so? If everyone's following the same course outline, shouldnt all notes and textbooks contain roughly the same information?

And since information can vary significantly between different textbooks and notes, are there any that are considered the best or "gold standard" for getting an A/A+ in the subjects? Is there anywhere I can see a list of the gold-standard study material/methods for scoring A/A+ in each subject?

I also want to ask how to pick out deficiencies in my notes. (Eg browsing through this website I came across a post that mentioned some must-do books for Pakistan studies, which I hadn't even heard of. Not only that, but the poster mentioned how one needs to look for specific topics in that book. How would I know if I'm deficient in an area? Eg, there might be a topic in the course outline I have studied, but I might not have studied it to the required detail (for scoring an A/A+). How do I get an idea of the required level of detail I need, so that I can decide when to look at additional resources?

As you can see, I'm very confused and really have a very poor idea of how to study for O levels. I'm sure theres a bunch of questions I should've asked, but didn't, simply due to my ignorance. I don't mind making my own notes or working hard, however, I'm thoroughly confused about how to go about it. I hope you guys can help me out, thank you!
I hope that this is my last reply.

In case you don't know what marking schemes are;
. Marking schemes have probably been released by Cambridge international since June 2004.
. These are answers/solutions to a particular paper/ you can find them year-wise on relevant websites (some of which I mentioned down below.)
.Marking schemes are officially released by Cambridge each year.
. Remember that marking schemes only contain pointers to an answer or the basic framework which is needed for a question. / What the examiner is "ideally" looking in an answer. They are only pointers and need to be developed from the book/books.

Examiner reports;
. These are reports presented each year by the Cambridge paper wise, it basically provides comments on each question given in the paper. How well the candidates/ those who appeared for the paper do and what were the common mistakes and how could they have been avoided and what the candidate had to write in the question.
They are available on some on the suggested websites.

* On websites Marking scheme = ms
Examiner report = er
Grade Threshold =gt
insert = in

* Pak Studies:
History - Paper 1
Geography - Paper 2
 
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And since information can vary significantly between different textbooks and notes, are there any that are considered the best or "gold standard" for getting an A/A+ in the subjects? Is there anywhere I can see a list of the gold-standard study material/methods for scoring A/A+ in each subject?
In my opinion, there is no term as "Golden books or golden words" for O level books/notes/resources. Every teacher/student/person has his/her own perspective of conveying a message/talking/writing about a particular topic.
Diversity is the key. Stick to different books and do not take shortcuts!
 
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In my opinion, there is no term as "Golden books or golden words" for O level books/notes/resources. Every teacher/student/person has his/her own perspective of conveying a message/talking/writing about a particular topic.
Diversity is the key. Stick to different books and do not take shortcuts!
Thank you so much! Your replies have helped me a lot.

If you don't mind, I would like recommendations on all subjects, ie science as well.

My understanding is that, roughly, this is the approach I should use:
1.I start with my textbook + school notes, and try to understand and memorize all the information contained in these two resources. If I'm unsure about something, I need to resolve it (by asking my teacher, googling, youtube etc). And then I write those clarifications on my textbook or classnotes to make sure I don't have to search the answer again in the future.
2.After this, I should solve topical questions on what I've just read. This will expose any weakness that I might have, which could be conceptual (I didn't understand something properly), rote-based (I forgot something thats in my notes), or a lack of detail in my notes (ie, I need to read about the topic in greater deal)
3.If I was able to successfully solve the topical questions, and my textbook + classnotes seems to cover everything, then I should consider them adequate
4.If not, I need to fill in the gaps (ask a teacher, internet, google, other textbooks etc)
5.I can also approach my teacher after every chapter is done, to discuss what I've read and where from, and if there are any topics I need to supplement further

Do you think I'm correct in my understanding in how to go about things?

Once again, thank you very much! I appreciate the detail with which you've answered.
 
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Thank you so much! Your replies have helped me a lot.

If you don't mind, I would like recommendations on all subjects, ie science as well.

My understanding is that, roughly, this is the approach I should use:
1.I start with my textbook + school notes, and try to understand and memorize all the information contained in these two resources. If I'm unsure about something, I need to resolve it (by asking my teacher, googling, youtube etc). And then I write those clarifications on my textbook or classnotes to make sure I don't have to search the answer again in the future.
2.After this, I should solve topical questions on what I've just read. This will expose any weakness that I might have, which could be conceptual (I didn't understand something properly), rote-based (I forgot something thats in my notes), or a lack of detail in my notes (ie, I need to read about the topic in greater deal)
3.If I was able to successfully solve the topical questions, and my textbook + classnotes seems to cover everything, then I should consider them adequate
4.If not, I need to fill in the gaps (ask a teacher, internet, google, other textbooks etc)
5.I can also approach my teacher after every chapter is done, to discuss what I've read and where from, and if there are any topics I need to supplement further

Do you think I'm correct in my understanding in how to go about things?

Once again, thank you very much! I appreciate the detail with which you've answered.
You have created an adequate summary of the replies! Good job.
- To point out that whatever subject you study, make sure that you are able to get the main concept of that topic in your head. Do not consider doing any topic without the concept.
Though there is no doubt that all subjects require memorization and are memory retentive.

SCIENCE SUBJECTS
POINT: Sciences is O levels is way more conceptual and the books are way thicker, mainly because they have loads of illustrative details and the books cover complete syllabus. Try to do sciences on a conceptual basis, once you open the topicals, for a moment there will be a feeling that you go all blank (I experienced it when I opened my topicals for the first time, I was almost about to cry, Thank you to a teacher who explained me well.)

2. A topic in particular topicals, might not be solely linked to that topic, so do not worry if you are not able to solve all the topical questions, mark out the ones which you cannot and confirm from your teacher whether we have studied that topic yet, If not then when will we study.
I say that they might not be linked to that topic solely because topicals contain questions from all the CAIE syllabus.

WEBSITES
All the websites that I suggested earlier
Save my exams - good for practicing MCQs of science subjects.

BOOKS :

- Chemistry matters - 2nd edition
- Physics matters - do not know the edition but the cover page has a man dressed in a red jumpsuit and helmet.
-Biology - Biology matters (green colored cover page)
- Computer science - IGCSE Computer Science - Hodder's education.
(These books are kind of expensive, try if you can arrange them second hand, in my opinion, these are mainly textbooks, for reading purposes so no such need to get them new)
. Do conceptual study in sciences and memorize only key points i.e. definitions, laws, formulas, etc.

TOPICALS
. Red spot (solved answers)
. MS Books (Marking schemes only)
Type: Topical
*BUY ANY 1

- No problem, it is good to help out anyone and see him/her avoiding the mistakes which I myself made in my time, despite the guidance of my teachers. I myself acknowledge that I understood the true sense of o levels 3 months before the exams.
- Best of luck on this journey. Remember that your worth is not defined by your grades.
 
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You have created an adequate summary of the replies! Good job.
- To point out that whatever subject you study, make sure that you are able to get the main concept of that topic in your head. Do not consider doing any topic without the concept.
Though there is no doubt that all subjects require memorization and are memory retentive.

SCIENCE SUBJECTS
POINT: Sciences is O levels is way more conceptual and the books are way thicker, mainly because they have loads of illustrative details and the books cover complete syllabus. Try to do sciences on a conceptual basis, once you open the topicals, for a moment there will be a feeling that you go all blank (I experienced it when I opened my topicals for the first time, I was almost about to cry, Thank you to a teacher who explained me well.)

2. A topic in particular topicals, might not be solely linked to that topic, so do not worry if you are not able to solve all the topical questions, mark out the ones which you cannot and confirm from your teacher whether we have studied that topic yet, If not then when will we study.
I say that they might not be linked to that topic solely because topicals contain questions from all the CAIE syllabus.

WEBSITES
All the websites that I suggested earlier
Save my exams - good for practicing MCQs of science subjects.

BOOKS :

- Chemistry matters - 2nd edition
- Physics matters - do not know the edition but the cover page has a man dressed in a red jumpsuit and helmet.
-Biology - Biology matters (green colored cover page)
- Computer science - IGCSE Computer Science - Hodder's education.
(These books are kind of expensive, try if you can arrange them second hand, in my opinion, these are mainly textbooks, for reading purposes so no such need to get them new)
. Do conceptual study in sciences and memorize only key points i.e. definitions, laws, formulas, etc.

TOPICALS
. Red spot (solved answers)
. MS Books (Marking schemes only)
Type: Topical
*BUY ANY 1

- No problem, it is good to help out anyone and see him/her avoiding the mistakes which I myself made in my time, despite the guidance of my teachers. I myself acknowledge that I understood the true sense of o levels 3 months before the exams.
- Best of luck on this journey. Remember that your worth is not defined by your grades.

Thank you very much for all your replies, I've modified the way I study over the last few days and I feel I understand how to go about it now!
 
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Thank you very much for all your replies, I've modified the way I study over the last few days and I feel I understand how to go about it now!
It was a pleasure.
For Islamiat I would like to add on:
My teacher suggested that for Islamiat, you shall make your own notes.
Supplies :
A past paper book, journal/ring binder registers, other stationery items.
- Method.
1. Decide a topic.
2. Pick out all the past paper questions for the relevant topic. (leave the ones, which you feel have repeated/answers matching out to some other past paper questions)
3. Write the question in your journal.
4. Consult different sources and write ten developed points underneath the question.
5. Formulate a final answer and get it checked by your teacher and then manipulate your answer according to his/her suggestions.
 
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Thank you very much for all your replies, I've modified the way I study over the last few days and I feel I understand how to go about it now!
Here is a video I recommend watching for more tips.
Check out the channel AYOTLI by sir Hunain Zia. You can listen to the videos for a grasp on the course, just a rough idea because at times you find it difficult to read through the book.

Develop interest in the subjects and you will be good to go.
Bye! BEST OF LUCK!
 
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